How to approach the topic of judging fairness of anything is an arduous task. However, thinking about how to approach the topic of judging fairness from the perspective of ancient Romans and Greeks thousands of years ago is an even more exigent agenda of thought and research.  As a group of researchers, our intent is to provide adequate insight on our collaborative thought processes and considerable supportive evidence of the conclusions drawn from our interpretations.
            To delegate and more effectively parse out our thoughts, this website is designed topically with individualized subject tabs.  The precession of focus topics is purposed to transcend basic-level knowledge and induce a labor of mind that gradually constructs an advanced, complex comprehension of the Classical time period and the way of thinking of those inhabitants of the era.
            The opening discussion is one of corporate decision.  We unwrap the simple meaning of  what is fair and examine the philosophies, organizations and significant beliefs of the time of Athenian Democracy and Roman Republicanism to derive a denotation similar to that which participants in these systems would themselves articulate.

 

    The term “fair” can be interpreted in many different lights. However, as a group, we found the most common definitions to be related to a subjective level of an “attractive” quality, and an objective definition pertaining to morality and uprightness.

    While both interpretations and the conclusions drawn as a result of them can be supported, our group chose to take a more objective approach by evaluating the ethics and moral principles of Athenian Democracy and Roman Republicanism in order to conclude exactly which classical government was the “fairest one of all.”


A clip from the popular Disney film “Snow White” depicting the evil queen asking the question at hand: “Who is the fairest of them all?” (See 0:25)